Program by Date

Abstracts will become available once the conference convenes.
Oral presentation abstract links are in the program below.

Poster abstract links HERE

 

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SUNDAY September 10, 2017

12 noon – 5:00 pm Registration – River Concourse
3:00 – 5:00 pm Poster Setup – Exhibit Hall
5:00 – 6:30 pm OPENING CEREMONY – Chatham Ballroom ABC, 2nd Floor
5:00 – 5:45 pm Welcome and Opening Remarks
Scott Jackson, Chair local organizing committee, University of Georgia
Gary Black, Commissioner of Agriculture, Georgia
5:45 – 6:30 pm Keynote: KS-01  How the soybean got to North America
Theodore Hymowitz, Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois
6:30 – 8:00 pm Opening Reception – River Concourse

MONDAY September 11, 2017

Chatham Ballroom ABC, 2nd Floor
8:30 – 9:00 am Plenary: PS-01 Positioning soybeans to thrive in the Global Food System
Randal Giroux, Cargill Incorporated, Minnesota, USA
9:30 – 10:00 am Regional Reports: North America
RR-01 Canada: 
Istvan Rajcan, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada
RR-02 United States:
Richard Joost, Smith Bucklin, St. Louis, Missouri, USA 
10:00 – 10:30 am COFFEE BREAK – Exhibit Hall


MORNING CONCURRENT SESSIONS
10:30 am – 12:00 noon

Joint Session: Breeding / 17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Optimal Designs for Genetic Improvement

Optimal Designs for Genetic Improvement

Conveners:

Commercial soybean breeding is being transformed into a systems engineering discipline through applications of applied mathematics and operations research. While the impact of OR on optimization of commercial plant breeding programs has been demonstrated to be large, we suggest that the proportional impact will be larger for small genetic improvement projects.  The primary purpose of this session is to demonstrate and discuss approaches to design efficient and effective systems for translating discoveries into genetic improvements using principles of operations research and applied mathematics.

BM-01 An overview of advanced analytics for improving agricultural systems
Arnie Greenland, University of Maryland, Maryland, USA
BM-02 Maximizing quantitative traits in the mating design problem
Susan Hunter, Purdue University, Indiana, USA
BM-03 Response surface methods for maximizing accuracy of genomic predictions
Reka Howard, University of Nebraska, Nebraska, USA
BM-04 Efficient breeding designs using genomic mating
Deniz Akdemir, Michigan State University, Michigan, USA
Food, Feed & Nutrition
Soybean Uses as Food and Food Ingredients

Soybean Uses as Food and Food Ingredients

Conveners:

There are many different types of food products and ingredients processed from the whole soybean.  They are used in traditional soyfood products like tofu, soymilk, miso, natto, tempeh and soy sauce, as well further processed into vegetable oil, full-fat and low-fat flours, grits, textured products and other specialty ingredients.  The range of products and applications is wide, from protein-rich meat- and dairy-alternative products, to baking ingredients, snack foods and even as a fresh, green vegetable.

F-01 Soybean uses as food and food ingredients
 Peter Golbitz, Agromeris, Florida, USA
F-02 Use of whole soy ingredients in food and beverage applications
 Paul Lang, Natural Products, Inc., Iowa, USA
F-03 Processing of soybean with extrusion technology for food and feed application
Mian Riaz, Texas A&M University, Texas,  USA
F-04 Making soy the preferred source of plant protein
John Cox, Soyfoods Association of North America, District of Columbia, USA

 

Agronomy & Physiology
Yield and Seed Composition Response to Environmental, Crop Management, and Genetic Factors

Yield and Seed Composition Response to Environmental, Crop Management, and Genetic Factors

Convener:

Soybean yield, quality, and composition are all affected by genotype and environment interactions. To some extent, yield and quality can be managed by planting dates, selection of specific maturity groups, and irrigation where available. This session will consider the impact of management and environment on yield and production risk, regional variations in seed protein, how crop management and genetics interact to affect protein, and genetic discoveries that improve seed quality of soybean maturing in hot environments.

A-01 Relating temperature and relative humidity in commercial warehouses to decline in vigor of soybean seed stored for late plantings in Arkansas
John Rupe, University of Arkansas, Arkansas, USA
A-02 Diversifying soybean production risk by managing planting date and maturity group
Michael Popp, University of Arkansas, Arkansas, USA
A-03 The path for the development and release of heat tolerant soybeans
James Smith, USDA-ARS, Mississippi, USA
A-04 Moving from average to maximum soybean yields – what will it take?
Sotirios Archontoulis, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
Weeds, Diseases, & Pests
New & Emerging Diseases

New & Emerging Diseases

Conveners:

Soybean is one of the most economically important field crops grown in the world and unfortunately, losses caused by both endemic and emerging diseases continue to be a major limitation affecting sustainable soybean production and producer profits. These new emerging soybean diseases are potential invasive threats as they migrate to new geographical areas. Continued global surveillance efforts are critical to early detection, awareness and implementation of appropriate control measures. Speakers in this session will discuss the development, biology and management strategies of various new emerging, invasive soybean diseases.

P-01 Soybean Diseases: Their importance and yield impact in the US and the world!
Tom Allen, Mississippi State University, Mississippi, USA
P-02 The current status and implications of emerging soybean diseases in Africa
Harun Muthuri Murithi, Tanzania and Wageninhen University, Tanzania, Netherlands
P-03 Taproot decline of soybean, an emerging disease in the southern United States
Trey Price, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Louisiana, USA
P-04 Soybean vein necrosis virus: Why should we care?
Damon Smith, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Special Topics
An Uncertain Future: How Emerging Rules and Regulations Could Impact Genomics Research that Utilizes Genetic Resources and Shares Genomics Data

An Uncertain Future:  How Emerging Rules and Regulations Could Impact Genomics Research that Utilizes Genetic Resources and Shares Genomics Data

Convener:  Tom Nickson, Consultant, Missouri, USA

Researchers that utilize genetic materials to collect genomics data (digital sequence information) should be aware of international and national efforts to establish legal means to ensure that benefit sharing occurs when biological resources are used globally.  Negotiations under the general title of "access and benefit sharing" are underway in both international and national fora.  Researchers that use new genetic techniques, sequence information, and biological materials from ex-situ sources should pay attention to these negotiations.  Regulatory developments in some countries are setting rules with regard to accessing and sharing digital sequence information.

S-01 ABS 101: an overview of the Nagoya Protocol
Stephanie Aktipis ,National Focal Point for U.S. Government, District of Columbia, USA
S-02 Implementation of the Nagoya Protocol at a national/regional level:  developing rules in the EU.
Tom Nickson, Nickson Research and Consulting, MO, USA
S-03 Experience working with crops not covered by the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture - peanut and soybean
Scott Jackson, University of Georgia, Georgia, USA
• Panel Discussion

 

12:00 – 1:30 pm LUNCH – Exhibit Hall


AFTERNOON CONCURRENT SESSIONS

1:30 pm – 3:40 pm

Breeding
Soybean Germplasm: Creation, Utilization, Dissemination and Domestication

Soybean Germplasm: Creation, Utilization, Dissemination and Domestication

Conveners:

  • Qijian Song, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, Maryland, USA
  • Lijuan Qiu, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China

Soybean germplasm is the basic breeding material for improving soybean yield, quality, resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, etc. and to study the history of the soybean evolution. Each year, new germplasms were collected, evaluated and efficiently utilized world-wide and new methods were developed to create novel germplasms. This section will cover the following topics: progress of soybean germplasm collection, evaluation and utilization; methods and progress of creation of new materials such as mutants, progeny from perennials x annual Glycine crosses, cytoplasmic male sterile lines and lines with special characteristics; construction of soybean core collection, soybean dissemination in the world and soybean domestication or any other germplasm-related topics.

B-01 Identifying soybean gene function using random and targeted mutagenesis
Robert Stupar, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, USA
B-02 Domestication history and geographical adaptation inferred from a genome-wide polymorphism map of Korean soybeans
Soon-Chun Jeong, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
B-03 Contribution of exotic germplasm to the success of a tropical soybean in Brazil
Marcelo Fernandes de Oliveira, Embrapa, Paraná, Brazil
B-04 Genetic diversity, geographical adaptation and distribution pattern of Chinese soybeans
Lijuan Qiu, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing, China
B-05 Genetic relationship with geographic origins and globe dispersion of soybean
Qijian Song, USDA-ARS, Maryland, USA
B-06 Recurrent selection during soybean domestication
Jianxin Ma, Purdue University, Indiana, USA
17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Stress Resistance

Stress Resistance

Conveners:

The global climate change affects plant growth-regulating factors such as temperature, water, and CO2. Plant stress physiology plays a crucial role in plant breeding and food security, focusing on how plants’ physiology respond to biotic and abiotic stressful environments. Topic will include insights into the development and function of plants from a gene to whole genome and its interaction within biotic and abiotic environments. The goal of the session is to share individual scholar’s knowledge on soybean stress physiology to improve crop quality and prepare the future weather conditions.  

M-01 Prospects for improving the ozone tolerance of soybean
Kent Burkey, USDA-ARS, North Carolina, USA
M-02 Evaluation of salt tolerant soybean germplasm and identification of salt stress tolerance genes
Rongxia Guan, The Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China
M-03 Using latest genomics technologies to study soybean stress biology
TingFung Chan, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Japan
M-04 Leveraging genomic tools to dissect iron deficiency tolerance in soybean
Michelle Graham, USDA-ARS-CICGRU, Iowa, USA
M-05 Transcriptomic and genomic approaches to identify soybean genes responsible for UV-B stress
Junming Ha, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
M-06 Understanding and improving flooding tolerance in soybean using genetic and genomic tools
Henry Nguyen, University of Missouri, Missouri, USA
Food, Feed, & Nutrition
Recent Developments in Soybean Processing and Utilization

Recent Developments in Soybean Processing and Utilization

Conveners:

Soybeans have versatile end-uses as food, feed, and industrial material thanks to their unique chemical composition and abundant availability. Recent advances in processing technology and breeding have helped to make soybeans into the world’s largest source of high quality edible oil and nutritional and functional protein ingredients for feed and food processing.  In addition, identity-preserved (IP) food-grade soybeans with special traits have help to create a growing global market for modern and traditional soyfood products. Topics to be covered include specialty soybeans, innovative commercial processes, aqueous extraction, traditional soyfoods modernization, soy-based synthetic oil, and more.

F-05 Specialty soybeans: how organic, non-GMO and identity preserved varieties meet the needs of a growing marketplace
Peter Golbitz, Agromeris, Florida, USA
F-06 Vegetable protein concentrates: a process to increase protein concentration of soybean and other oilseeds
Richard Ozer, Crown Iron Work, Minnesota, USA
F-07 Processing soybeans for food and feed through aqueous extraction: current status and challenges
Keshun Liu, USDA-ARS, Idaho, USA
F-08 Progress in science and technology for traditional Chinese fermented soyfoods
Yanguo Shi and Nan Zhang, Harbin Institute of Commerce. Harbin, China
F-09 The utilization of novel soy milk ingredients separated by the Ultra Soy Separation (U.S.S.)
Masahiko Samoto, Fuji Oils, Japan
F-10 Stearidonic acid soybean oil chemistry – concentration and enzymatic modification
Cas Akoh, University of Georgia, Georgia, USA
Agronomy & Physiology
Soybean Nutrient Management Across the Globe

Soybean Nutrient Management Across the Globe

Conveners:

Soybean removes large amounts of nutrients from the soil, but generally receives low rates of fertilizer. Improved nutrient management may increase soybean yields and thereby help close the yield gap between current and attainable yields. Soybean production systems vary greatly among different regions of the world in terms of cropping, soil, and nutrient management. Responses of soybean to nutrient input can be strongly influenced by crop management practices. This session will address increasing soybean yields through responsible nutrient and crop management to enhance the economic, social, and environmental sustainability of soybean systems. We will discuss the outcome of a three-year global research project investigating nutrient management and its interaction with crop management practices for soybean production systems in high-yielding regions/countries (US, South America) and new regions/countries (Russia, India, China, Africa), with a special presentation dedicated to biological N fixation in high-yield environments.

A-05 Breaking yield barriers in soybean through crop and nutrient management
Ignacio Ciampitti, Kansas State University, Kansas, USA
A-06 Nitrogen nutrition: Would BNF be sufficient for high-yielding soybeans?
Fernando Salvagiotti, EEA INTA Oliveros, Argentina
A-07 Looking for high yielding soybeans at Sub Saharan Africa
Shamie Zingore, Sub Saharan Africa Program
A-08 Nutrient management of soybean in the Brazilian Cerrado
Eros Fracisco, IPNI, Brazil Program
A-09 Reviewing nutrient management for high yielding soybeans in Russia
Svetlana Ivanova and Vladimir Nosov, IPNI, Central and Southern Russia Programs
A-10 Nutrient Expert: A fertilizer decision support tool for soybean
Ping He and Kaushik Majumdar, IPNI, China and South Asia Programs
General discussion: Moderators: Mike Stewart and Fernando García, IPNI, North America and Latin America-Southern Cone Programs
Weeds, Diseases, & Pests
Global Status of SDS & Its Control

Global Status of SDS & Its Control

Conveners:

Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is an important soybean disease reported in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Malaysia, Paraguay, South Africa, United States, and Uruguay. It is caused by several species of Fusarium which belong to the F. solani complex (clade 2). These are slow-growing species which have co-evolved with soybean. In this crop, they produce root rot and also typical foliar symptoms not observed in other species of Fabaceae. Yield losses of up to 100% have been reported in very susceptible cultivars under favorable environmental conditions. The main strategies to manage SDS include the use of moderately resistant cultivars and practices which prevent or reduce soil compaction. Seed-treatment fungicides can help prevent early root infection. This session will address different aspects of this pathosystem, including updated information on the taxonomy of the Fusarium spp. involved, and recent advances in SDS epidemiology and management.

P-05 An update on the Fusarium spp. involved in SDS
Martin Chilvers, Michigan State University, Michigan, USA
P-06 Sudden death syndrome in the United States
Leonor Leandro, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
P-07 Sudden death syndrome in Brazil
 Ludwig Pfenning UFLA, Brazil
P-08 Sudden death syndrome in Argentina
Mercedes Scandiani, CEREMIC, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
 P-09 Advances in sudden death syndrome management
Yuba Kandel, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
 P-10 Meta-analysis for quantitative resistance to soybean sudden death syndrome
Hao-Xun Chang, Michigan State University, Michigan, USA
Special Topics
Emerging Frontiers in Breeding and Genomics

Emerging Frontiers in Breeding and Genomics

Conveners:

Model crop species like soybean have benefited from the adoption of cutting edge technologies that generate large datasets. This session will discuss advances being made in both genomics and proteomics, as well as methodological approaches to advance breeding efforts and functional genomics.

S-04 A novel strategy of genomic selection in breeding for soybeans
Junyi Gai, Nanjing Agricultural University, Jiangsu, China
S-05 A proteomic view of symbiotic nitrogen fixation efficiency in Bradyrhizobium elkanii
Bret Cooper, USDA-ARS, Maryland, USA
S-06 A single nucleotide deletion in J encoding GmELF3 confers long juvenility and is associated with adaption of tropic soybean
Hai Nian, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China
S-07 Vegetable soybean expansion in India: challenges and opportunities
Ramakrishnan Nair, World Vegetable Center, Telangana, India
S-08 Soybean Protein-protein Interaction Prediction Engine (Soybean-PIPE): a computational approach in soybean functional genomics
Bahram Samanfar, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ontario, Canada
S-09 A versatile approach to define gene-centric haplotypes using dense SNP data
Aurélie Tardivel, Université Laval, Quebec, Canada

 

3:40 – 6:00 pm SNACK BREAK & CASH BAR – Exhibit Hall
3:40 – 6:00 pm POSTER SESSION – Exhibit Hall
4:00 – 5:00 pm Grantmanship workshop
Getting Funding from the NSF: Strategies for Success
Diane Okamuro, NSF Integrated Organismal Systems, Virginia, USA

TUESDAY September 12, 2017

Chatham Ballroom ABC, 2nd Floor
8:30 – 9:00 am Plenary: PS-02 Proven and proposed health benefits of soyfoods
 Mark Messina, Nutrition Matters & Soy Nutrition Institute, Nevada, USA
9:30 – 10:00 am Regional Reports: South America
RR-03 Argentina: Rodolfo Rossi, ACSOJA – Argentine Soybean Chain Association, Santa Fe, Argentina
RR-04 Brazil:
  Silmar Teichert Peske, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil
10:00 – 10:30 am COFFEE BREAK – Exhibit Hall


MORNING CONCURRENT SESSIONS
10:30 am – 12:00 noon

Joint Session: Breeding/ 17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Designing the Soybean of the Future

Designing the Soybean of the Future

Convener: Richard Joost, Smith Bucklin, Missouri, USA

Soybean [Glycine max (L.)Merr.] is a remarkable plant species for its unique biology, evolutionary history, and utility for civilization. First imported to the United States from China in 1765 by Samuel Bowen, the intended purpose was to manufacture soy sauce and vermicelli. One hundred and fifty years later, soybean acreage was still less than 2 million acres and largely used for hay. Today soybean is the second most planted field crop in the U.S., totaling over 80 million acres and producing over 3.9 billion bushels. Only a small percentage of today’s soybean crop is used for soy sauce, vermicelli and hay. Instead it is primarily used for animal feed, edible oil and biodiesel. What will the soybean of the future look like? The soybean industry is poised to become a duel oil market with the introduction of high oleic oil beans. But what will be next? This session will delve into how compositional traits might be modified in the future to meet the needs of end users and keep soybean farmers profitable. In addition, with increasing use of technology on the farm, restrictions to inputs, and pressure for sustainability, farming is likely to look very different as well. This session will also explore how soybeans may be modified to fit the needs of the future farmer.

BM-05 Perfect beans in the 21st century: the who, what, and how of developing them
Danny Singh, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
BM-06 Building a better bean: it will take a community that thinks big
Thomas Clemente, University of Nebraska, Nebraska, USA
BM-07 The holy grail of US soybean value
Gordon Denny, Gordon Denny LLC, USA
BM-08 From the ground up, we’re all part of the food chain
Tom Oswald, United Soybean Board Director, Iowa, USA
Food, Feed and Nutrition
Soy Proteins and Bioactives

Soy Proteins and Bioactives

Conveners:

Soybean proteins and many minor compounds (such as isoflavones, tocopherols, lectin, oligosaccharides, etc.) have been identified to be bioactive and have health benefits to humans and animals.  Research on this area has provided a major drive for increasing soybean consumption around the world.  This session covers soy proteins and other bioactive compounds with respect to their presence, isolation methods and health benefits.

F-11 Value added uses of bioactive soy proteins and hydrolysates
Navam S. Hettiarachchy, University of Arkansas, Arkansas, USA
F-12 Presence of soy-derived peptides in animal and human blood after ingestion of enzymatic hydrolysate of soy protein
Sato Kenji, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
F-13 The physiological effects of beta-conglycinin in rats
Kazunori Koba, Department of Nutritional Science, University of Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
F-14 Beyond nutrition: The soy protein and the bioactives
Vidyadhar Kawalkar, Food and Nutrition Technology Institution, Bhopal, India
Agronomy & Physiology
Seed Treatments

Seed Treatments

Conveners:

  • Daren Mueller, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
  • Albert Tenuta, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada

This session will explore some of the current issues, challenges and opportunitites for seed treatment use on soybean. This includes a look at how seed treatments may affect other agronomic practices.

A-11 Sensitivity of pathogens to seed treatments
 Anne Dorrance, Ohio State University, Ohio, USA
A-12 Neonic seed treatment use in Canada
Luc Bourgeois, Bayer CropScience Inc.
A-13 Possibilities for biological seed treatments
Tristan Mueller, BioConsortia, California, USA
A-14 Adjusting agronomic practices with seed treatment use
Adam Gaspar, DuPont Pioneer, Iowa, USA
Weeds, Diseases, & Pests
The Complexities of Managing Nematodes

The Complexities of Managing Nematodes

Convener: Nathan Schroeder, University of Illinois, Illinois, USA

Plant-parasitic nematodes are a major constraint to soybean production. The soybean cyst nematode continues to be one of the most damaging pathogens of soybeans.  In addition, several other nematodes cause yield loss in geographically restricted ranges. This session will highlight the biology and management of plant-parasitic nematode from diverse locations.

P-11 Lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp): the obscure nematode pest of soybean in the North Central U.S
Ann MacGuidwin,
University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA
• P-12 Stem cells and neurons: new target for SCN control?
Nathan Schroeder, University of Illinois, Illinois, USA
• P-13 Finding solutions from the wild-broad resistance to soybean cyst nematodes (SCN) in wild soybean
Bao-Hua Song
• P-14 The changing dynamics of plant-parasitic nematodes in the South and increased prevalence/importance of reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis)
Charles Overstreet, Louisiana State University, Louisiana, USA
Special Topics
Emerging Frontiers in Agronomy and Pest Management

Emerging Frontiers in Agronomy and Pest Management

Convener:  Anna Locke, USDA-ARS, North Carolina, USA

S-10 The contemporary geoeconomy of soy production chain in Brazil and its consolidation in the global market
Roberto Costa Cunha, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil
S-11 Influence of seed rate and stages of harvesting on seed yield and quality of soybean cv.Dsb-21
Ravindaranth Hunje, University of Agricultural Sciences, Karnataka, India
S-12 The fate of soybean residue-carbon links to changes of bacterial community composition in Mollisols differing in soil organic carbon
Tengxiang Lian, South China Agricultural University, Guangdong, China
S-13 Prevalence of Physiological races of Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. and molecular variability of its isolates causing Asian Soybean Rust in India
Shamarao Jahagirdar, University of Agricultural Sciences, Karnataka, India

 

12:00 – 1:30 pm LUNCH – Exhibit Hall


AFTERNOON CONCURRENT SESSIONS

1:30 pm – 3:40 pm

Breeding
Seed Composition

Seed Composition

Conveners:

The composition of the soybean seed determines its value as a crop. Soybean seeds in their immature and mature forms have been used for millennia as components of many different human foods, particularly in East Asia. Most modern uses of soybean rely on the two main products produced after processing: vegetable oil and a high protein meal. The purpose of this session is to highlight soybean breeding for improved seed composition affecting the quality of the vegetable oil, improving the functionality of soybean meal, and composition traits related to soybean seeds for food uses.

B-07 Soybean breeding for healthier oils with optimized ratios of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids
Jeong-Dong Lee, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea
B-08 Soybean breeding in the USA for high oleic/low linolenic acid soybean oil
Kristin Bilyeu, USDA-ARS, Missouri, USA
B-09 Profile analysis: an excellent tool for breeding seed saponin composition in soybean
Chigen Tsukamoto, Iwate University, Iwate, Japan
B-10 Modifying soluble carbohydrates in soybean seed for enhanced nutritional energy meal
Katy Rainey, Purdue University, Indiana, USA
B-11 Challenges and opportunities of breeding for oil quantity and yield in soybean
Istvan Rajcan, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada
B-12 Identification of meta-QTLs associated with protein and oil contents and compositions in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] seed
Kyujung Van, The Ohio State University, Ohio, USA
17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Genome Diversity and Structural Variation

Genome Diversity and Structural Variation

Conveners:

The first genome assembly of Glycine max laid the foundation for  genomics based improvements in soybean breeding. With next-gen sequencing cost reductions, we are now accumulating large sequence data sets from diverse soy lines. SNPs constitute much of the variation that has been identified to date although structural variants also play a significant role in genome variation. The analyses of sequence variants will be key to advancements in soy breeding, causative variation underlying traits, and plant biology overall. This session will focus on the discovery, description, organization and utilization of sequence and structural variation in soybean germplasm.

M-07 Transmission of on-target and off-target mutations in a series of CRISPR/Cas9-induced soybean plants
Robert Stupar,
University of Minnesota, Minnesota, USA
M-08 Exploiting Medicago structural variation to discover novel genes for nodulation and symbiosis
Nevin Young,
University of Minnesota, Minnesota, USA
M-09 Detection and genetics of structural diversity in soybean
Matt Hudson,
University of Illinois, Illinois, USA
M-10 Dissecting the genetic basis of resistance to soybean cyst nematode for soybean breeding
Yinghui Li, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China
M-11 Identification of large deletions in soybean lines using a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach
Marc-André Lemay,
IBIS, Quebec, Canada
M-12 Structural and transcriptomic comparisons between soybean reference genomes and soybean's Australian wild relatives
Jacqueline Campbell,
Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
Food, Feed and Nutrition
Soybeans as Industrial Materials

Soybeans as Industrial Materials

Conveners:

  • X. Susan Sun, Kansas State University, Kansas, USA
  • Jin Zhu, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Soybeans as Industrial Materials session focuses on the development of affordable and widely available intermediate chemicals and bio products from soybean and its ingredients, such as soybean meals, protein concentrates, oils, and hulls as renewable resources with minimum impact on human health and the environment.  Chemicals and bio products include, but not limited to adhesives, surfactants, coatings, composites, water absorbents, acrylates, epoxies, foams, polyols, high performance structural materials, and fuels. We invite you to submit abstracts and presentations in the areas of developing affordable and enabling intermediate chemicals and bio products that improve soybean production and benefits of soybean growers, processing industries, end user industries, and environment.

F-15 Emulsion polymerization of soybean oil-based acrylic monomers
Andriy Voronov, Coatings and Polymeric Materials, North Dakota State University, North Dakota, USA
F-16 Progress on soybean oil based thermosetting resins
Jin Zhu, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences
F-17 Use of soy protein and oil as feedstocks for valuable renewable polymer materials
Jinwen Zhang, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Washington, USA
F-18 Limitations of polymers derived from soybean oilseeds
Xiuzhi Susan Sun, Grain Science and Industry, and Bio and Agr Engineering, Kansas State University, Kansas, USA
Joint Session: Physiology/ Weeds, Diseases, & Pests
Designing the Soybean of the Future

Designing the Soybean of the Future

Conveners:

Physiology and pathology have always been connected in the plant sciences.  Genetic improvements to plant physiology have helped thwart diseases.  At the same time, plant diseases have revealed underlying secrets of plant biochemistry, cell structure, and anatomy.  This session aims to take a contemporary look at the intersection between physiology and pathology and promote a perspective for designing a soybean for the future through these disciplines of study.

AP-01 Molecular insights into nematode-induced changes to hormone physiology and signaling
 Melissa Mitchum, University of Missouri, Missouri, USA
AP-02 Potyviral effector targets and viral co-opting of the untranslated protein response in soybean
Aardra Kachroo, University of Kentucky, Kentucky, USA
AP-03 Phakopsora pachyrhizi  (soybean rust) effector candidates that alter plant immune responses
Steve Whitham, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
AP-04 Phakopsora pachyrhizi secretome expressed during soybean interaction and characterization of effector candidate families
Francismar Marcelin-Guimaraes, Embrapa, Paraná, Brazil
AP-05 Physiological and molecular basis of flooding tolerance in soybean
Christian Bredemeier, Universidad Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Special Topics
SoyBase Workshop

SoyBase Workshop

Presenter:  David Grant, USDA-ARS, Iowa, USA

The tutorial will present an overview of the data and tools available at SoyBase. The templates used for submitting research results to SoyBase will be presented along with examples of their use. Ample time will be available for questions from the audience

 

3:40 – 6:00 pm SNACK BREAK & CASH BAR – Exhibit Hall
3:40 – 6:00 pm POSTER SESSION – Exhibit Hall
4:00 – 6:00 pm Even-numbered poster authors will be present

WEDNESDAY September 13, 2017

Chatham Ballroom ABC, 2nd Floor
8:30 – 9:00 am Plenary: PS-03 A Science-Based Approach to Measuring and Advancing the Sustainability of U.S. Crop Production
Rod Snyder, Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture, District of Columbia, USA
9:30 – 10:00 am Regional Reports: Africa/Europe
RR-05 Africa Report: Antony Jarvie, PANNAR Seed, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
RR-06 Europe Report: Donal Murphy-Bokern, Special Scientific Advisor, Donau Soja Organization, Austria
10:00 – 10:30 am COFFEE BREAK – Exhibit Hall


MORNING CONCURRENT SESSIONS
10:30 am – 12:00 noon

Breeding
USAID Soybean Program in Africa

USAID Soybean Program in Africa

Convener: Brian Diers, University of Illinois, Illinois, USA

The topic of this session is the use of soybean in development in Africa. It will specifically focus on results from the USAID funded soybean value chain project and other topics related to how soybean can be produced profitably and utilized in developing countries in Africa.

B-13 Soybean for Africa: an economist’s perspective
Pete Goldsmith, University of Illinois, Illinois, USA
B-14 Genetic improvement of soybean in Ethiopia: implications for the countries agricultural growth and development
Abush Tesfaye, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Ethiopia, Africa
B-15 Progress in the SARI soybean breeding program under the Soybean Innovation Lab
Nicholas Denwar, CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Ghana, Africa
B-16 Soybean breeding in Africa: IITA achievement and future outlook
Godfree Chigeza, IITA, Lusaka, Zambia
B-17 Identifying allele combinations for maximizing soybean adaptation to tropical environments
Kristin Bilyeu, USDA-ARS, Missouri, USA
B-18 The role of soy-based foods in complementary feeding
Juan Andrade, University of Illinois, Illinois, USA
B-19 Determinants of soybean adoption and performance in Northern Ghana
Courtney Tamimie, University of Illinois, Illinois USA
17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Current Topics in Soybean Genetics and Genomics

Current Topics in Soybean Genetics and Genomics

Conveners:

  • Robert Stupar, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, USA
  • Wenbin Li, Northeast Agricultural University, Heilongjiang, China

This session will focus on the emerging projects and cutting-edge discoveries in soybean molecular genetics and applied genomics. Presentations will focus on the mechanisms of soybean gene regulation and the identification of genes governing soybean responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Furthermore, presentations will address new tools and strategies to enhance soybean genetic improvement.

M-13 SoyaGen: an integrated and applied genomics project for short-season soybean
Francois Belzile, Pavillon Charles-Eugène Marchand, Quebec, Canada
M-14 The evolutionary novelty of microRNAs and their targets in soybean and other legumes
Blake Meyers, Danforth Center, Missouri, USA
M-15 Combining genomics and effector biology to develop new ways to combat Phytophthora sojae
Brett Tyler, Oregon State University, Oregon, USA
M-16 Abiotic stress related genes confer tolerance to drought, salt, and low temperature in soybean
Yongguang Li, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China
Food, Feed and Nutrition
The Role of Soyfoods and Soy Protein in Meeting Global Health and Nutrition Needs

The Role of Soyfoods and Soy Protein in Meeting Global Health and Nutrition Needs

Conveners:

For centuries, soyfoods have been widely consumed throughout much of Asia. Outside of Asia soy has gained in popularity over the past several decades as the consumption of the traditional Asian soyfoods and soy-based Western foods has markedly increased. Evidence indicates that this trend will continue, since soy can meet the health and nutritional needs of a growing world population. The sheer numbers of ways by which soy protein can be consumed make it easy to be embraced by different cultures. The greater demand for high-quality protein such as soy protein also helps reduce risk of chronic diseases. The quality of soy protein is similar to that of animal protein but it favorably affects markers of coronary heart disease in contrast to many other sources of protein. Soy protein may also help to address the obesity epidemic through its satiating effect and by protecting against obesity-induced liver disease which is now occurring even in young people. In addition, studies show that soy protein by itself, when combined with other high-quality proteins, is able to promote lean tissue accretion. Therefore, soy protein can have a role in preventing sarcopenia. Age-related loss of muscle mass with its associated functional decline is an important public health concern because of the increasing number of older people. While many trends favor greater soy consumption, the rampant misinformation about soy becomes a counterbalancing factor. Claims that soy exerts adverse effects are refuted by the totality of the scientific literature but greater efforts are needed to make sure the public understands this is the case.

F-19  Current evidence for role of soy in support of health across the lifespan
Michelle Braun, DuPont Nutrition & Health, St. Louis, MO
F-20 Protein needs for a growing global population: current and future landscape
Phil Kerr, Serio Nutrition Solutions, LLC
F-21 Emerging benefits of soy protein on liver and metabolic health
R. Scott Rector, University of Missouri and Harry S Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, MO
F-22 Setting the record straight: refuting the misinformation about soyfoods
Mark Messina, Nutrition Matters & Soy Nutrition Institute, Nevada, USA
• Panel Discussion
Agronomy & Physiology
Soybean Sustainability: Documenting, Communicating and Advancing Success Through the Supply Chain

Soybean Sustainability: Documenting, Communicating and Advancing Success Through the Supply Chain

Convener: Shawn Conley, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA

This session will discuss methods that successfully document and advance the US soybean sustainability continuum from behind the farm gate through the supply chain and to the customer.

A-15 Sustainability and domestic and international soybean policy
Ron Moore, President of American Soybean Association, Missouri, USA
A-16 Building and scaling a pre-competitive framework for agricultural supply chain sustainability efforts
Rod Snyder, President Field to Market, District of Colombia, USA
A-17 A practical approach to soybean sustainability metrics
Paul Mitchell, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA
A-18 Growing farm returns through soil health
Nick Goeser, Director of Soil Health and Sustainability; Soil Health Partnership, Missouri, USA
Weeds, Diseases, & Pests
Balancing Economic and Environmental Trade-offs in Soybean Pest Management: a Focus on Neonicotinoid Seed Treatment Use in Row Crop Agroecosystems

Balancing Economic and Environmental Trade-offs in Soybean Pest Management: a Focus on Neonicotinoid Seed Treatment Use in Row Crop Agroecosystems

Convener:  Anders Huseth, North Carolina State University, North Carolina, USA

Meeting agricultural demands of the growing global population, while balancing consequences of increased scale and the intensity with which a limited array of pest management practices are being deployed will require a better understanding of the trade-offs involved with soybean pest control and the many challenges these interventions present. To date, the intensification of existing row crop production systems has focused on advanced breeding coupled with technology driven pest management to maximize yields (e.g., seed treatments, GE herbicide tolerant and insect resistant traits). Unfortunately, some of these changes to row crop pest management are thought to be the underlying cause for unanticipated impacts on non-target arthropods, increased pest pressure, and further reliance on pesticides for profitable production. In this symposium, we will compare and contrast current research to better understand interactions between neonicotinoid seed treatment use in soybean and the effects these insecticide interventions can have on farmer profit, pest control, insecticide resistance, and ecosystem services. To conclude, the final theme of this symposium will be a short discussion designed to help attendees contextualize these findings into a realistic production framework, identify research priorities, and generate new questions that will improve the sustainability of soybean production worldwide.

P-15 Economic value of neonicotinoid seed treatments in US soybean
Paul Mitchell, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA
P-16 Neonicotinoid seed treatment use for soybean aphid: opportunities and limitations
Matt O’Neal, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
P-17 Pollination on soybean: importance and impacts of pest control practices
Decio Gazzoni, EMBRAPA, Parana, Brazil
P-18 Areawide use of neonicotinoid seed treatments drives thrips resistance in the Southeast US row crop production region
Anders Huseth, North Carolina State University, North Carolina, USA
Business & Legal
The Global Regulatory Environment

The Global Regulatory Environment

Convener: Ray Shillito, Bayer Crop Sciences, North Carolina, USA

In the present environment where 83% of the global soybean acreage is enhanced by Biotechnology, the regulatory environment for Biotech has a significant effect on trade and introduction of commercial varieties and traits, and therefore also affects research into new soybean traits.   Regulation of biotechnology, although nominally based on the Codex and OECD guidelines, is heterogeneous and varies from one country or trading block to another.  This variability leads to asynchronous approvals of new traits, and to the delay of making improved traits available to farmers as they wait for approval in importing countries.  Uncertainty around global evolution of regulatory frameworks and how new breeding techniques will or will not be regulated are also affecting the speed and direction of technology development.  Differences in Varietal Registration and Phytosanitary requirements also affect movement and commercialization of improved seed.  This session will explore the consequences of regulatory requirements on research and the development of improved varieties and traits, and particularly the effect of high regulatory hurdles on Academic research and variety development.   We will review the regulatory situation and look to the future of regulations as new technologies such as gene editing come to market.

L-01 Global regulatory environment for traditional biotech (including asynchronous approvals)
Ann Tuttle, Bayer CropScience, North Carolina, USA
L-02 Experiences of an academic with the regulatory environment
Tom Clemente, University of Nebraska, Nebraska, USA
L-03 GM and varietal registration in Brazil, and the effect of gene editing technology on regulations
Alexandre Nepomuceno, CNPSO, Brazil
L-04 New plant breeding approaches in soy and the future (includes gene editing)
Feng Zhang, Calyx, Minnesota, USA

 

12:00-1:30pm LUNCH – Exhibit Hall


AFTERNOON CONCURRENT SESSIONS

1:30 pm – 3:40 pm

Joint Session: Breeding/17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Genomics Assisted Breeding for Accelerating Soybean Native Traits

Genomics Assisted Breeding for Accelerating Soybean Native Traits

Conveners:

Recent advances in genomic and high performance computing technologies are great asset for further improving soybean germplasm diversity and breeding varieties for increased yield and native traits to meet the growing needs in farmers’ fields worldwide. This session will cover both industry and academic perspectives on genomic assisted breeding in soybean for improving (Useful) genomic diversity and accelerating genetic gain and native traits in elite germplasm.

BM-09 Genomic assisted breeding overview
Aaron Lorenz, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, USA
BM-10 Using genomics for high-resolution haplotype characterization and identifying novel trait-associated variation
John Woodward, DuPont-Pioneer, Iowa, USA
• BM-11 The role of germplasm as a key factor in the changes of crop production systems and yield increase in South America
Marcos Quiroga, GDM Seeds, Brazil
 • BM-12 Opportunities and challenges in soybean genomics assisted breeding
Hongwu Jia, Bayer, USA
BM-13 Application of genomic breeding systems to accelerate native traits and the rate of genetic gain in soybean breeding
Rajat Aggarwal, Dow Agro Sciences, Indiana, USA
• BM-14 Plant breeding: the intersection of analytics and big data
Warren M. Kruger,  Monsanto, Missouri, USA
Food, Feed and Nutrition
Soybeans and Aquaculture

Soybeans and Aquaculture

Conveners:

Aquaculture is the fastest growing food production sector on Earth.  The growth in this sector is driven by increasing global demand for the healthy and delicious protein resources aquaculture delivers.  Soybeans are an important resource for fin fish and shrimp aquaculture, providing nutritious, economic, and sustainable protein and lipids. This session updates latest research on expanding soy usage in aquafeeds in this diverse and dynamic industry.

F-23 Soy in Aquaculuture – US soy’s investment in aquaculture research
Andy Tauer, Soy Aquaculture Alliance, Indiana, USA
F-24 Improving feed formulations for juvenile Red Drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, through nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolomics
Aaron Watson, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, South Carolina, USA
F-25 High soy shrimp feeds for the pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei
D. Allen Davis, Auburn University, Alabama, USA
F-26 Development of low cost feed grade soybean protein concentrates for aquafeed
Keshun Liu, Rick Barrows, and Steve Hart, USDA-ARS, Idaho, USA
F-27 Utilization of protein source from soy in aquaculture feed
Toshiro Masumoto, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan
Agronomy & Physiology
Integrating Precision Agriculture and Yield Gap Analysis to Minimize Production Risk

Integrating Precision Agriculture and Yield Gap Analysis to Minimize Production Risks

Convener:  Shawn Conley, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA

In this session, we will discuss tools and techniques to apply precision agriculture to soybean production systems. Real world examples that take the complexities of on-farm application into consideration will be presented. Case studies that characterize management-related yield variation, estimate yield gaps and identify management decisions to improve soybean yield and productivity will be presented.

A-19 Precision agriculture, big data, and future of farming
Raj Khosla,
Colorado State University, Colorado, USA
 A-20 Application of precision agriculture technologies and analytics tools in soybean
Peter Kyveryga, Iowa Soybean Association, Iowa, USA
A-21 Combining field surveys and a spatial framework to identify causes of yield gaps over large geographic regions
Juan Ignacio Rattalino Edreira, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
A-23 Unraveling the effect of on-farm management on soybean yield using grower supplied field data
Spyridon Mourtzinis, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, USA
Weeds, Diseases, & Pests
Managing Insect and Weed Resistance

Managing Insect and Weed Resistance

Conveners:

We have invited speakers from Universities within the US to discuss their respective experiences and research tackling the issue of resistance. These speakers include entomologists (3) and weed scientists (2) who are dealing with pests that have evolved resistance to pest management practices. Our final speaker will discuss a novel approach that stakeholders within Iowa are developing to address this issue at the community level for all pests that attack field crops, including soybeans, a major crop within the Midwest and Iowa.

P-19 The weed resistance reality in the U.S.: where we’ve been and where we’re headed
Kevin Bradley, University of Misouri, Missouri, USA
P-20 What to do when over-zealous herbicide use exacerbates pest management problems
David Mortensen, Penn State, Pennsylvania, USA
P-21 Dangers at home and abroad- why dispersal matters in soybean insect resistance management
Dominic Reisig, North Carolina State University, North Carolina, USA
P-22 Evidence for soybean aphid resistance to pyrethroid insecticides and considerations for insecticide resistance management
Robert Koch, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, USA
P-23 Managing soybean aphid virulence: a genetic perspective
Andy Michel, Ohio State University, Ohio, USA
P-24 Iowa pest resistance management plan: implementing a community-based approach
Steve Bradbury, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
Business & Legal
Marketing, Trade and Policy

Marketing, Trade and Policy

Convener:  Marshall Martin, Purdue University, Indiana, USA

Since 1960, global soybean production has expanded more than 10-fold, and is expected to continue to grow dramatically. The United States, Brazil, and Argentina are the three largest producers and exporters of soybeans. China is the largest importer of soybeans (about two-thirds of total global soybean trade), followed by the European Union, Mexico, Japan and Taiwan. In 2015, China alone accounted for nearly 35% of the exports from the United States, one-half the Brazilian soybean exports, and about 11% from Argentina. Processed soybeans are the world's largest source of animal protein feed and the second largest source of vegetable oil. Economic success for soybean farmers, processors, and traders requires an understanding of trade policies, currency exchange markets, transportation logistics, and regulatory requirements. This session will explore these issues from an industry, government, and academic perspective.

• L-05 An overview of global soybeans supply and demand situation
John Baize, John C Baize and Associates, Virginia, USA
• L-06 Will protectionism thwart global oilseed growth?
Joseph Glauber, International Food Policy Research Institute, District of Columbia, USA
 • L-07 Grower perspectives on the global trade policy landscape
Ron Moore, American Soybean Association, Illinois, USA
 • L-08 South American supply outlook: challenges and opportunities
Marcos Daziano, University of Bueno Aires, Bueno Aires, Argentina
3:40 – 6:00 pm SNACK BREAK & CASH BAR – Exhibit Hall
3:40 – 6:00 pm POSTER SESSION – Exhibit Hall
4:00 – 6:00 pm  Odd-numbered poster authors will be present

THURSDAY September 14, 2017

Chatham Ballroom ABC, 2nd Floor
8:30 – 9:00 am Plenary: PS-04  How Bright is the Future for Soybeans?
 Krysta Harden, DuPont-Pioneer, USA
9:30 – 10:00 am Regional Reports: Asia/Australia
RR-07 Asia & Australia Report:
Tianfu Han, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
10:00 – 10:30 am COFFEE BREAK – Exhibit Hall


MORNING CONCURRENT SESSIONS
10:30 am – 12:00 noon

Breeding
Drought Tolerance in Soybean: Physiological and Genetic Advances Using Native Trait Diversity

Drought Tolerance in Soybean: Physiological and Genetic Advances Using Native Trait Diversity

Conveners:

Summer drought is the most important limitation to soybean production. Irrigation is not commercially viable in many cases. Thus, stress-tolerant varieties will be our most important weapons in soybean’s continuing battle with adverse weather. To date, very few drought resistant soybean varieties have been developed. The reason is that drought tolerance in soybean is a new breeding target with a short history. The discovery of the first drought-tolerant soybean (from Japan) was reported only in 1989. Breeders taking up the ‘drought challenge’ are finding that drought tolerance is both ‘hard to breed for’  and difficult to understand. To realize the full potential of this complex trait in farmers’ fields, the soybean community needs the help of dedicated physiologists who can grapple with those complexities and coach our applied breeders to success.  This session highlights advances of physiologists in our understanding of native trait diversity for drought response.

B-20 Untangling traits, mechanisms, and alleles associated with delayed wilting, canopy temperature, and C13/C12 ratio
Larry Purcell, University of Arkansas, Arkansas, USA
B-21 Targeting physiological traits for drought tolerance: water conservation and nitrogen fixation
Tom Sinclair, North Carolina State University, North Carolina, USA
B-22 Exploring soybean root architecture – genetic diversity, markers, and improvement
Felix Fritschi, University of Missouri, Missouri, USA
B-23 Physiological and molecular approaches in breeding for drought tolerance in soybean
Omar Borsani, Agronomía, Montevideo, Uruguay
17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Translational Genomics

Translational Genomics

Convener: Gary Stacey, University of Missouri, Missouri, USA

The session will have four speakers focusing on using modern genetic and functional genomic methodologies for gene discovery and crop improvement in soybean. The program reflects the global importance of soybean and the variety of research taking place worldwide. The session also will provide wide coverage with talks focusing on exploiting natural variation in soybean (e.g., GWAS), to mutational breeding approaches, especially to improve seed traits, to efforts to increase soybean stress tolerance. The presentations will also highlight the variety of uses that can be made of the soybean genome sequence to move science forward and in a way to support translation to be improve soybean crop production.

M-17 Development of sequencing for genotyping within soybean breeding programs
David Hyten, University of Nebraska, Nebreaska, USA
M-18 Genome aided gene discovery in soybean for crop improvement
Minviluz G. Stacey,
University of Missouri, Missouri, USA
M-19 Soybean proteomics to identify the abiotic stress tolerant mechanism
Setsuko Komatsu, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
M-20 Genomics survey for genes related to domestication and improvement in soybean
Zhixi Tian, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Beijing, China
Food, Feed and Nutrition
Recent Updates, Challenges and Opportunities for High Oleic Soybean Components

Recent Updates, Challenges and Opportunities for High Oleic Soybean Components

Conveners:

According to industry estimates, high oleic soybeans could reach ~18 million acres by 2023 which would make them the 4th largest row crop in the US.  With this advancement, the superior functional properties of its components such as the oil itself, the lecithin and the resulting meal after the crush, are of increasing interest to the industry and are being evaluated in a variety of applications.  While the breeding and genetics of high oleic soybeans are discussed in other sessions, the latest developments in food applications and commercial uses, including results from a clinical trial incorporating the positive nutritional oil profile into a variety of foods will be highlighted in this session.

F-28 Introduction to high oleic soy: overview of technical and commercial status
Susan Knowlton, DuPont Pioneer, Delaware, USA
F-29 Low trans solid fat functionality: the role of interesterified high oleic soybean oil based shortenings
Tom Tiffany, ADM Oils, Illinois, USA
F-30 Use of high oleic soybean oil to improve cardio metabolic health in at-risk adults
David Baer, USDA, Maryland, USA
F-31 Use of biotechnology to enhance soy protein ingredients
Dan Staerk, DuPont Nutrition and Health, Missouri, USA
F-32 Functionality and application of high oleic soybean oil for the replacement of partially hydrogenated oils: An industry perspective
Guillermo Napolitano and Yubin Ye, Nestle Development Center, Ohio, USA
Agronomy & Physiology
It Takes a Community: The role of Biostimulants and Biological Products for Optimal Soybean Yields

It Takes a Community: The role of Biostimulants and Biological Products for Optimal Soybean Yields

Convener: Maud Hinchee, Agricen Sciences, Texas, USA

Increases in yield in agricultural production have primarily relied upon improved soybean genetics and conventional management practices such as fertilization and the use of chemical pesticides.  However, as systems biology advances, it is becoming more evident that the soil microbiome and the phtyobiome can have profound effects on plant growth, development and health.  In addition, signaling molecules, such as microbial secondary metabolites or by-products, and plant growth regulators, can be used to improve plant stress tolerance, vigor and yield.   This session introduces newly emerging basic and applied research in the area of plant biostimulants, biological products and the influence of the phytobiome or rhizobiome on plant growth and development, with a special emphasis on soybean production.

A-24 Overview of biostimulants and plant growth-promoting bacteria
Joseph Kloepper, Auburn University, Alabama, USA
A-25 Navigating the world of biostimulants
Brian Cornelius, Agricen, Texas, USA
A-26 “Plants wear their guts on the outside…”A quote from D.H. Janzen, 1985
Ann Hirsch, University of California, California, USA
Weeds, Diseases, & Pests
Strategies for Disease & Pest Management

Strategies for Disease & Pest Management

Convener: Richard Joost, Smith Bucklin, Missouri, USA

Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] was first introduced to North America over 250 years ago. Like most new introduced plant species, the soybean enjoyed a brief period of relative freedom from pest and disease pressure, with the exception of generalist pests that frequently attack many plant species. Over time, many of the pests and diseases that had evolved with their soybean host in its native Asia gradually found their way to the Western Hemisphere. Often these pests and diseases were introduced without their necessary alternate hosts and/or the parasites/predators that evolved with them in Asia. The developmental dynamics of these pests and diseases; including their life history, distribution and spread have a significant impact on their control and management in soybean production systems. This session will focus on insect and fungal disease pests of soybean, their spread and distribution, life history and the management practices that have been developed to control them in soybean production systems.

P-25 Phytophthora and other soil-borne diseases of soybean
 Anne Dorrance, The Ohio State University, Ohio, USA
P-26 Development and management of kudzu bug and brown marmorated stink bug
Jeremy Greene, Clemson University, South Carolina, USA
 P-27 Crop management for stink bug control
Adeney Bueno, EMBRAPA
 P-28 How the soybean aphid genome and transcriptomics provides insight into molecular mechanisms of adaptation to aphid resistant soybean
Andy Michel, Ohio State University, Ohio, USA
Business & Legal
Intellectual Property, Law, and Licensing

Intellectual Property, Law, and Licensing

Convener: Brent Marable, University of Georgia Research Foundation, Georgia, USA

Over the last few decades, advancements in soybean research and innovations by industry and academia have included in part higher yields, increase disease and pest resistance, enhanced nutritional qualities, and advanced breeding techniques. Intellectual property protection allows developers of such new innovations, including new soybean varieties and improved traits, an opportunity to recoup their investments, while also confronting many of the economic, environmental and health issues faced as a global society.  This session will explore these issues from both industry and academic perspectives including an international purview.

• L-09 The good, the bad and the off-type - strategies for variety protection and licensing
Dana Rewoldt, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
• L-10 IP issues - building your fence while avoiding the thicket
Sheree Rybak, Klarquist Sparkman, LLP, Oregon, USA
• L-11 Licensing for a fist full of dollars - foundational systems for soybean licensing and agreements
James Weatherly, Seed Innovation and Protection Alliance, Colorado, USA

 

12:00 – 1:30 pm LUNCH – Exhibit Hall


AFTERNOON CONCURRENT SESSIONS

1:30 pm – 3:40 pm

Breeding
Breeding for Biotic Stress

Breeding for Biotic Stress

Conveners:

  • Istvan Rajcan, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada
  • Tianfu Han, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China

The session is designed to cover topics around breeding of soybeans for resistance to biotic stress such as pest and diseases. Classical and molecular approaches towards this goal will be explored including with emphasis on genes and that govern resistance and define host-pathogen relationships.

B-24 Role of Rhg1 and other resistance genes in controlling SCN in soybean
Brian Diers, University of Illinois, Illinois, USA
B-25 Defense and counter defense during Phytophthora sojae-soybean interaction
Yuanchao Wang, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China
B-26 Arabidopsis nonhost resistance genes for enhancing disease resistance in soybean
Madan K. Bhattacharyya, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
B-27 Fine-mapping and characterization of a novel gene conferring resistance to soybean mosaic virus
Yingpeng Han, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China
 B-28 Contribution of genetics to the integrated management of Asian soybean rust in Brazil
Carlos Alberto Arabal Arias, Embrapa Soja, Parana, Brazil
B-29 Genomic context as a determinant for soybean aphid resistance mechanisms and synergistic effects of gene stacking
Gustavo MacIntosh, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
17th Biennial Conference on the Molecular & Cellular Biology of the Soybean
Output Traits

Output Traits

Conveners:

This session will focus on the latest advances in improving soybean seed composition through the use of advanced genetic methods, including systems approaches to soybean breeding, biotechnology and genome editing. The presentations, with speakers from academic, government and industry institutions, will highlight efforts to increase the seed oil and protein content as well as improving oil and meal quality of soy for feed, food and aquaculture.

M-21 System approaches to increasing the oil content of soybeans
Leah Hale, The Ohio State University, Ohio, USA
M-22 Biotechnology approaches to improving soybean composition
Knut Meyer, DuPont Pioneer, Iowa, USA
M-23 Synthetic design of soybean for improved aquaculture feed traits
Ed Cahoon, University of Nebraska, Nebraska, USA
M-24 Enhancing the amino acid composition of soybeans
Hari Krishnan, USDA
M-25 Improving soybean composition by genome editing
Glenn Bowers, Calyxt
 M-26 A Zinc Finger Transcription Factor GmZF-1, regulates isoflavone biosynthesis in soybean
Junming Sun, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China
Food, Feed & Nutrition
Soybean Processing For Food and Occurrence of Bioactive Components

Soybean Processing For Food and Occurrence of Bioactive Components

Convener:

  • Keshun Liu, USDA-ARS, Idaho, USA
  • Vish Prakash, International Union of Nutritional Sciences, Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Bangalore, India

Soybean is versatile with respects to its end uses as food, feed and industrial material. There are also many ways of processing soybeans into various food products, either traditional products like tofu or modern ones like soy oil and protein products. Soybean is also known as a powerhouse of bioactive components, many of which have been shown to be health beneficial. Speakers of this session, representing various countries across continents, discuss about latest research on processing soybeans into traditional and modern soyfoods and ingredients, occurrence of soy bioactives with respects to genetic variation and quantification, and community effort for soy awareness.

F-33 The research process in the aqueous enzymatic extraction of vegetable oil and protein
Lianzhou Jiang and Liang Li, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China
F-34 Production of vegetable protein concentrates and biologically active substances based on 3D-structuring principle
Natalia Khabibulina, Partner-M JSC, Kaluga, Russia
F-35 Protein particles in soymilk and its role in controlling the quality of tofu
Shuntang Guo and Yanling Wan, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China
F-36 Spermidine in soybean: genetic variation of a potential health component
Johann Vollmann, BOKU University, Vienna, Austria
F-37 Quantification of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean through densitometry
Vineet Kumar, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soybean Research, Indore, India
 F-38 The effect of soya awareness training for community success. A comparative study in South African communities
Abdulkadir Egal, Vaal University of Technology, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Special Topics
High-Throughput Phenotyping

High-Throughput Phenotyping

Conveners:

There is currently a major emphasis in both the public and private sectors to enhance research on development of rapid and precise crop phenotyping methods to accelerate the development of improved crop cultivars. Field-based high-throughput phenotyping provides important tools for unravelling complex questions concerning crop development and response to the environments by connecting plant genotypes to phenotypes. These emerging phenotyping technologies will increase the capacity and precision of agricultural research by reducing the time and resources involved in evaluating large field based research experiments. In this session, the development and applications of high-throughput phenotyping methods and platforms in crop research will be presented and discussed.

S-14 Utilizing multi-spectral readings to differentiate genotypes in two soybean NAM populations
William Schapaugh, Kansas State University, Kansas, USA
S-15 Shifting the field R&D paradigm to technology driven phenotyping
Bobby Brauer, Monsanto Company, Missouri, USA
S-16 Use of water trough collectors in the field to evaluate drought tolerance of soybean
Junkui Ma, Shanxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China
S-17 Phenotyping solutions for basic and applied research in plant biology and agriculture
Todd M. DeZwaan, LemnaTec Corporation
S-18 Using ultra-high resolution multispectral drone imagery for high-throughput phenotyping
Kevin Price, AgPixel, Iowa, USA
S-19 Experiences in field phenotyping: from hand-helds to UAVS
Jeffery White, USDA-ARS, Arizona, USA
Special Topics
SoyBase Workshop

SoyBase Workshop

Presenter:  David Grant, USDA-ARS, Iowa, USA

The tutorial will present an overview of the data and tools available at SoyBase. The templates used for submitting research results to SoyBase will be presented along with examples of their use. Ample time will be available for questions from the audience.

3:40 – 6:00 pm SNACK BREAK & CASH BAR – Exhibit Hall
3:40 – 5:30 pm POSTER SESSION – Exhibit Hall
Posters must be removed by 6:00pm
7:00 – 10:00 pm Closing Reception/Awards Banquet – Hyatt Regency Ballroom
Separate ticket purchase required and are available at the registration desk, while supplies last